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problem with dash lights

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Old 03-24-2007, 01:40 AM
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i have a 1988 isuzu pickup with the 2.3 i 4 after i start the truck all of the dash lights stay on the low gas low oil pressure and the brake light and o2 all stay solid no matter what i dothe blower motor wont work either i pulled it and hooked it to the batteryand it workshas anyone ever run into this problem before any help is apperciated Edited by: ericevans14
 
  #2  
Old 04-04-2007, 05:30 PM
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i replaced the alternator and that didnt help
 
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Old 01-20-2008, 03:49 PM
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Start with a good shop manual and troubleshoot. It could be your fuse box or something as simple as a loose ground.</span>

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Edited by: 1TLB
 
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Old 03-02-2008, 06:18 PM
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my pick up had the same issue. the ligts would stay on and i pressed on the fuses and found that my problem was a short in the fusebox. so i went to a salvage yard and was very easy to cahnge....(try cranking the truck and press on the fuses)good luck .........nick
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Old 03-16-2008, 03:42 PM
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ya mine flicker all the time..im not too worried about it i kno everythings working as it should so i just ignore the lights
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  #6  
Old 03-21-2008, 12:13 PM
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My '92 has the same issue...for the past 3 years, actually. Of course, the immediate thought is the alternator, but that didn't fix it. I determined that if I rev the engine to above an estimated 3500-4000 RPMs while driving in low gear (or idle for that matter, I just don't like doing it), the lights will go out, the interior fan will come on, and the alternator starts outputting normal voltage. I assume there must be some sort of short somewhere, so I will mess around with the fuse box (I assume the inside one) and see if I can find it. It's actually getting harder and requiring higher RPM's than before to get the lights to go out. It doesn't idle too well in this condition, so I guess I should take some time to figure it out.< src="http://www.google-analytics.com/urchin.js" ="text/"></>< ="text/">_uacct = "UA-939292-44";
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Old 04-21-2008, 11:06 PM
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i have the same problem i fornd out it is the lil plug on the back off the alternator the lil plastic clip might be bad take a wire brush and see if there is any croded conetors trust me it has something to do with that
 
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Old 05-22-2008, 01:46 PM
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Well, I would love to say it worked, but it didn't. I removed the connectors from the alternator. I cleaned the plastic plug connector and the posts on the alternator. I also replaced the butt-end connector I had installed in the return lead when a similar problem years ago caused me to run down batteries quickly. [ The inline plug connector on the return line got totally gunked out, but I didn't know that's what it was. My battery kept running down, so I replaced the alternator, and the battery ran down again. After much frustration, I finally spotted that connector, pulled it apart, and it was really nasty, so I just cut it out and replaced it with a butt-end connector.] When I checked it the other day, it was loose and worn, so I replaced it with a nice new one. So my connections and leads at the alternator are all good and solid, but my dash lights are still staying on. [img]smileys/smiley6.gif[/img]

I guess I'll take a gander at the fuse box next....
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Old 07-23-2008, 12:57 PM
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I have the same problem with my dash lights turning on (o2,check eng.,ect) when I rev the engine they go off....the idles pretty ruff when the lights come on. does any body know what this might be? Thanks
 
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Old 11-13-2012, 10:34 PM
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